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A doughnut was launched 97,000 feet into space

Sat 20th May, by Annem Hobson

A doughnut has been catapulted high into the sky at 97,000 feet. Why I hear you ask? Well, ever wanted to see what happens to a doughnut that has flown all the way to space and made it back? If you have, then wonder no more as a Kansas City based bakery, called Donutology worked on the 4-hour journey that saw it travel 253 miles between earth and space. If we’re going to be picky about it, like other weather-balloon-powered launches, it’s not technically ‘outer space’ – as it would still be within the stratosphere. Pretty impressive stuff for a dessert to achieve though.

The doughnut was preserved using a thick layer of protective silicon, which is the key thing to note here as it left it completely inedible. Sorry to any space men and women hoping for a delivery of fresh doughnuts, but this step was necessary in order for it to survive the trip.

Donutology have unveiled an interactive display featuring the ‘Space Donut’ under glass alongside a deflated weather balloon, a map of the flight path and a video depicting the doughnut’s journey.

Check out the full launch video here:


This of course isn’t the first time a doughnut has been experimented with as back in 2015, Swedish researchers sent one into space too, in what was at the time – a world first.

You can check out that doughnut’s journey here:

This is almost as cool as that time when Space X took a wheel of cheese on a private space craft journey.

Or when a Wigan based bakery in the UK sent a meat and potato pastry pie into the sky.

If there really is alien life in the universe, I wonder what on earth they think is happening?

About the author

Annem Hobson

Annem Hobson

Blogger-in-Chief, So Wrong It’s Nom

@SoWrongItsNom

Inventor of the world's first Cheese Advent Calendar & Cheester Egg. You’ll find me talking all things food on talkRADIO’s Full Set Breakfast Show with Paul Ross, every month and occasionally on BBC Regional Radio.

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